Local cancer intelligence for London

We cover 33 Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) (including West Essex due to patient flow), which can also be thought of as 5 sectors, North London, North East London, South East London, South West London and North West London. 

Outputs available from recently completed work include:

  • Cancer registration ascertainment in Kent, London, Surrey and Sussex A NCRAS key performance indicator identified the London regional registration office as an outlier in the percentage increase in registrations for 2013, compared to the average of the previous three years.  This report investigates the cause of this, and discusses the impact of the migration to one national electronic registration system.
  • Cancer survival by stage in London.  In June 2016, NCRAS published figures on cancer survival by stage in England, in collaboration with the Office for National Statistics. Analysis has been carried out to further understand cancer survival for the London population and how this compares with England.  The key findings are summarised in a data briefing and the supporting data is available in this workbook.

  • Investigation of emergency presentations in London The analysis of routes to diagnosis of cancer in London highlights that the reduction in emergency presentations in London has been worse than nationally. Therefore, we extended the analysis to investigate the variation in emergency presentations with a further breakdown into: Accident and Emergency, GP Referral, Inpatient Emergency and Outpatient Emergency. Data by year of diagnosis and cancer type is presented for 2006 to 2013.

  • Distribution of age and stage in London and West Essex A number of our routine outputs include breakdowns of age at diagnosis and stage of cancer. However, we don’t often include a breakdown by a combination of these two factors. As such, we have investigated the distribution of age within each stage of cancer alongside the distribution of stage within each age group. This workbook presents the number of tumours diagnosed in London and West Essex during 2012 to 2014, by age at cancer diagnosis and stage of cancer. Data has been presented by cancer group and geography. This is a descriptive analysis to allow us to start to understand the interaction between the two factors in terms of number of cancers diagnosed.

  • Map of trend in emergency presentation of cancers in London, 2006 – 2013 Nationally, survival rates are lowest among patients diagnosed through the emergency route.  Therefore, data on emergency presentation as a route to diagnosis is of particular interest.  We wanted to visualise trends in emergency presentation over time (2006 – 2013), and this online application includes a heat map of proportions of tumours diagnosed through the emergency route.

  • Routes to diagnosis of cancer in London, including major resections A number of national publications have been published on routes to diagnosis, and can be found here.  London has a number of unique geographies (sectors and integrated cancer systems) which require a bespoke approach.  This workbook is an extension of the national work, and includes a focus on tumours treated with a major resection.  This workbook shows data on the routes to diagnosis for 48 cancer groups.  A breakdown by key demographic factors (gender, age, deprivation and ethnicity) is also presented.  The list of the types of major resections used here is the same as those in the national publications, and the workbook presents the proportion of patients diagnosed through each route to receive a major resection in 16 cancer groups.

  • What is the current cancer landscape in London? It is not completely clear what the current cancer landscape is in London, influencing us to combine all of our outputs from 2015 into a London narrative.  Key measures have been combined, to produce a data-driven viewpoint of the current situation in London.

  • Excess cancer cases in London, 2011-13 Excess cases are the number of cancer cases in the local area over and above the number that would be expected to occur if the area had the same age and sex specific rates as England for that tumour type.  Figures have been calculated using cancer registration data and mid-year population estimates for the years 2011-2013.

  • Excess deaths from cancer in London, 2011-13 Excess deaths are the number of deaths occurring in the local area over and above the number that would be expected to occur if the area had the same age and sex specific mortality rates as England for that tumour type.  Figures have been calculated using cancer registration data and mid-year population estimates for the years 2011-2013.

  • Cancer prevalence in London In this workbook are the numbers of persons diagnosed with cancer during 1991 to 2013 who are still alive at the end of 2013.  Both numbers and crude rates are presented.

Workbooks and other outputs will be uploaded here once completed.  

Local Intelligence

Local Cancer Intelligence

Region specific work

East of England

London

 NCRAS - TCST Partnership